Does Crest 3D White Have You Brushing with Plastic?

see a consumers facebook post:Crest-Facebook-PostJust as recent as last month, Facebook posts began appearing like the one above warning consumers away from Crest3D White and other brands of toothpaste that are resulting in plastic embedded in their gums have really peaked our attention.  It leads us to ask the question: Does Crest 3D White Have You Brushing with Plastic?

Brushing-With-PlasticAccording to a response article posted at snopes.com, “This warning could reference any one of a number of entries in the line of Crest products aside from Crest 3D White “Arctic Fresh” toothpaste, such as Crest 3D White “Vivid” toothpaste or Crest Complete Extreme Herbal Mint toothpaste, which contain hydrated silica, a sand-like substance that serves as an abrasive to exfoliate the teeth of food and other particles, and/or polyethylene.”  http://www.snopes.com/medical/drugs/crest.asp#i3kEw6wL3xiAkyIt.99

Polyethylene is defined as: a tough, light, flexible synthetic resin made by polymerizing ethylene, chiefly used for plastic bags, food containers, and other packaging.  So…………the thought of plastic rubbing on your teeth and sticking around for the long-haul in your mouth is an alarming one – we agree!

Crest defines polyethylene a little differently:
Q: What is polyethylene?
A: The small green particle found in the Extreme Herbal Mint flavor of Crest Whitening Expressions is made of polyethylene. It’s a safe, inactive ingredient used to provide color. http://news.crest.com/faq-item/crest-complete-faq/what-polyethylene

After more digging online, we found a mom / dental hygienist test the product out.  She was curious if it would dissolve in water, but alas it did not.  Acetone or alcohol wouldn’t even allow this pesking stuff to dissolve!  See her findings below:
http://www.dentalbuzz.com/2014/03/04/crest-imbeds-plastic-in-our-gums/

Plastic-in-Toothpaste-Not-Dissolving

Plastic-Balls-In-Gums

If you do notice blue dots in your gums, a possible result could be an amalgum tattoo — a solitary discrete gray, blue, or black discoloration of tissue caused by small amounts of dental amalgam that became embedded under the surface, which we do see fairly often.

Obviously YOU make the ultimate decision on which toothpaste you choose to use, although the results are a bit alarming.  Please comment if you have experienced any of these findings, we would love to learn more!




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